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Best Homemade Chili Recipes

Best Homemade Chili Recipes



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Homemade Chili Shopping Tips

Basic Latin ingredients include chiles, rice, adobo seasoning, and beans.

Homemade Chili Cooking Tips

Latin food often packs a lot of heat, so try to moderate the amount of chiles and spices you use for your dish.

Wine Pairing

Malbec, syrah/shiraz, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, primitivo, or carménère for meat-based chili; Riesling, gewürztraminer, muscat, or torrontés for vegetarian or poultry-based chili.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 pounds lean ground beef
  • 1 quart water, or amount to cover
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ (1 ounce) square unsweetened chocolate
  • ¼ cup chili powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 5 whole allspice berries
  • 1 bay leaf

Place the ground beef in a large pan, cover with about 1 quart of cold water, and bring to a boil, stirring and breaking up the beef with a fork to a fine texture. Slowly boil until the meat is thoroughly cooked, about 30 minutes, then remove from heat and refrigerate in the pan overnight.

The next day, skim the solid fat from the top of the pan, and discard the fat. Place the beef mixture over medium heat, and stir in the onions, tomato sauce, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, chocolate, chili powder, salt, cumin, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cloves, allspice berries, and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 hours. Add water if necessary to prevent the chili from burning.


We use both red kidney beans and chili beans in our homemade chili recipe. We drain the red kidney beans, but we don’t drain the chili beans. The reason is because the chili beans already have seasoning in them, and we want to include that flavor and spice.

Traditionally, chili is made with beef or pork. We’ve tried chicken before, but it just doesn’t offer the same comforting flavors.

Our favorite meat to use in homemade chili is 85/15 ground beef. The fat content packs this best chili recipe with flavor, and it’s also more affordable than something like bison or a leaner piece of beef.


Chili Cheese Crescent Dog Bake Recipe

They just aren&rsquot for Super bowl, game day or special occasions. They&rsquore for every occasion that is a fun gathering and everyone wants to have a good time eating appetizers and beer! Or soda pop!

Ok, so it&rsquos super simple to make this chili cheese dog bake. It starts with some simple crescent roll dough. Choose your favorite cheese (we love cheddar and American cheese!). Roll the crescent dough that&rsquos stuffed with a hot dog and a bunch of cheese. Add some of your favorite chili and lots of warm oven love. After about 45 minutes, voila! You can a wonderful warm meal for all chili cheese hot dog lovers!

Video: Chili Cheese Crescent Dog Bake &ndash So easy and so good!:

There&rsquos so many different types of hot dogs out there ranging from pork, beef, turkey and even vegan tofu! So you have plenty of options to choose from for this chili cheese bake. The reason why our chili cheese hot dog bake is so popular is because it can serve many people at once. It&rsquos so quick and easy to roll a bunch of cheese and hot dogs in crescent rolls and bake them. In fact, during our taste test, we did two batches at once and it literally took just a few minutes. The problem was we had two huge platters that needed to be eaten!

Best way to cook crescent dough with hot dogs?

The key is to bake the rolls covered in foil first, then continue baking them without the foil. This ensures that the dough cooks all the way through, leaving you with warm tender crescent dough filled with the best chili cheese dogs on Earth! They&rsquore the perfect appetizer or full meal! Make sure to bake the rolls covered in foil first, then continue baking them without the foil. This ensures that the dough cooks all the way through, leaving you with warm tender crescent dough filled with the best chili cheese dogs on Earth!


Recipe: Grandpa Frank’s chili

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Last month we asked people to submit their best recipes for the Trail Appliances favourite family recipe contest.

From over three hundred entries we have narrowed it down to five finalists. Each of the finalists will make their dish with chef Wayne Sych of Joe Fortes.

Here, finalist Arleigh shows us how to make her grandpa Frank’s chili.


The Best Secret Ingredients for Chili

Here are some of the most common (and most effective) flavor boosters to add to your chili recipe.

Booze (Beer, Wine, or Liquor)

Beer chili is a whole genre, and adding a bottle of your favorite brew is a wise move, but other kinds of alcohol can add their own little something-something. A smaller amount of red wine imparts richness, depth, and body to beefy chili (like a larger amount does to boeuf bourguignon), and a shot or two of liquor like bourbon—even vodka or tequila—toward the end lifts the other flavors without obviously announcing its own presence. Still, as you were warned in college, you’re best off choosing one booze and sticking to it rather than mixing them.

Liquid Smoke

If you want to add a smoky dimension to your chili, this is a no-brainer, although if you’re opposed to the oft-maligned ingredient, a few teaspoons of chipotles in adobo makes a nice substitute, as does smoked paprika. You could also use bacon, but most commercial brands are actually treated with liquid smoke to give them that characteristic tang—so you may as well reach for the bottle in the first place. (You can also mash-up these first and second options by adding a smoked beer to your chili.)

Chowhound’s Smoked Chili recipe relies on smoked beer and smoked sausage

Brine or Vinegar

A few tablespoons of brine from a jar of pickled jalapeños (or any sort of pickles, really), stirred in at the end as a finishing touch, adds a bright acidity that perks everything up. Plain white vinegar can work the same magic trick—even balsamic or apple cider vinegar, if you want a suggestion of sweetness too.

Not just for stir fries, a few dashes of soy sauce enhances the umami savor of your chili, and is good for adding some meaty depth to veggie chilis too. Liquid aminos can do the same. You might even try miso in small doses.

This serves the same purpose as soy, really: emphasizing meaty umami notes and bringing a little piquant salt. Added judiciously, it doesn’t taste at all like fish once stirred into the pot. Some people even use a couple anchovies as a briny, umami-rich component that melts away into the other ingredients.

Red Boat Vietnamese Fish Sauce, $6.28 from Walmart

Our favorite brand of fish sauce.

Worcestershire Sauce

Similar to but more complex than soy sauce, liquid aminos, and fish sauce, Worcestershire sauce is another great umami amplifier that’s why it turns up in Bloody Marys, after all. (And while traditional Worcestershire sauce contains anchovies, you can find vegan Worcestershire too if you need to boost your meatless chili.)

Coffee or Espresso Powder

A moderate amount of bitter, roasty espresso, strong-brewed black coffee, or instant coffee granules will beef up the deep, complex flavors of chili, and work well alone or in concert with a little chocolate.

Added in the form of cocoa powder or unsweetened baking chocolate, this secret ingredient adds another subtle bass note, but you can also try dark chocolate that contains some sugar for a twin touch of sweetness, or even sandy Mexican chocolate (with dark sugar and cinnamon already added) to complement the spicy, acidic, and umami flavors.

Taza Mexican Chocolate Sampler, 8 for $19.99 from Amazon

Mexican chocolates infused with flavors like chipotle, coffee, and vanilla are even more intriguing options for your chili.

Sweet Spices

Cinnamon is a fairly common addition to chili, but you can also use small amount of nutmeg, cloves, allspice, and other sweet spices to make it more aromatic. Even a bit of star anise can enhance the beefy, spicy flavor of chili without being too licorice-forward (add too much, though, and it may taste more like pho).

Chowhound’s Jerk Turkey Chili recipe includes cinnamon and chocolate

Peanut Butter

Some people swear by peanut butter to add a little fatty oomph to leaner veggie chilis, but it also shows up in meaty versions, from turkey to beef (and, hey, peanut butter burgers are a thing). Using a natural peanut butter will give you that creamy richness and nutty nuance without too much added salt and sugar.

Dark, slightly smoky, and a little sweet in a caramelized way, molasses is another method of adding a certain je ne sais quoi to your chili. Use unsulphured molasses, dark if you like a stronger flavor, but stay away from the blackstrap variety, which is much more bitter.

Marmite or Vegemite

Divisive though they may be, European imports Marmite and Vegemite are both complex, strong, salty flavor bombs that boost the baseline tastes of your chili. You don’t need to go out of your way to buy either one, but if you happen to have a jar in your pantry, why not scoop a smidge into the pot?


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Preparation

    1. 1. Place the chiles in a straight-sided large skillet over medium-low heat and gently toast the chiles until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Don't let them burn or they'll turn bitter. Place the chiles in a bowl and cover them with very hot water and soak until soft, 15 to 45 minutes, turning once or twice.
    2. 2. Drain the chiles split them and remove stems and seeds (a brief rinse helps remove seeds, but don't wash away the flesh). Place the chiles in the bowl of a blender and add the cumin, black pepper, 1 tablespoon salt and 1/4 cup water. Purée the mixture, adding more water as needed (and occasionally scraping down the sides of the blender jar), until a smooth, slightly fluid paste forms (you want to eliminate all but the tiniest bits of skin.) Set the chile paste aside.
    3. 3. Return skillet to medium-high heat and melt 2 tablespoons of the lard. When it begins to smoke, swirl skillet to coat and add half of the beef. Lightly brown on at least two sides, about 3 minutes per side, reducing the heat if the meat threatens to burn. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with 2 more tablespoons of lard and the remaining beef. Reserve.
    4. 4. Let the skillet cool slightly, and place it over medium-low heat. Melt the remaining 1 tablespoon of lard in the skillet add the onion and garlic and cook gently for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the stock, the remaining 2 cups water and gradually whisk in the masa harina to avoid lumps. Stir in the reserved chile paste, scraping the bottom of the skillet with a spatula to loosen any browned bits. Add the reserved beef (and any juices in the bowl) and bring to a simmer over high heat. Reduce heat to maintain the barest possible simmer (just a few bubbles breaking the surface) and cook, stirring occasionally, until the meat is tender but still somewhat firm and 1 1/2 to 2 cups of thickened but still liquid sauce surrounds the cubes of meat, about 2 hours.
    5. 5. Stir in the brown sugar and vinegar thoroughly and add more salt to taste gently simmer 10 minutes more. At this point, it may look like there is excess sauce. Turn off the heat and let the chili stand for at least 30 minutes, during which time the meat will absorb about half of the remaining sauce in the skillet, leaving the meat bathed in a thick, somewhat fluid sauce. Stir in additional broth or water if the mixture seems too dry. If the mixture seems a bit loose and wet, allow it to simmer a bit more (sometimes we like to partially crush the cubes of beef with the back of a spoon to let them absorb more sauce). Adjust the balance of flavors with a bit of additional salt, sugar, or vinegar, if you like.
    6. 6. Reheat gently and serve in individual bowls with a dollop of sour cream on top and a lime wedge on the side.

    From Lobel's Meat Bible: All You Need to Know About Meat and Poultry from America's Master Butchers by Stanley, Evan, Mark, and David Lobel, with Mary Goodbody and David Whiteman. Text copyright © 2009 by Morris Lobel & Sons, Inc. photographs © 2009 by Lucy Schaeffer. Published by Chronicle Books LLC.


    How To Make It

    This Crock Pot Chili is very simple! It does take a little bit of prep work, but it is all worth it in the end.

    • Start by cooking your onion and garlic, then browning the ground beef. This needs to be done before the beef goes into the slow cooker.
    • Once the beef is cooked, all of the remaining ingredients get added to the crock pot, along with the cooked beef.
    • Cook the chili on low.
    • When you are ready to serve, scoop the chili out into bowls and top with your favorite chili toppings.


    Directions

    Put on disposable latex gloves.

    Place a wire rack inside a quarter- or half-sheet tray. Using your hands and kitchen shears, cut open chilies and place them on rack. Shake rack to sift off most of the seeds (don't worry about removing all the seeds). Transfer chilies to a bowl and discard seeds.

    Using a spice grinder and working in batches, process chilies until they are ground to a size just larger than standard chili flakes. Transfer processed chilies to a heatproof bowl or pot large enough to accommodate bubbling oil (at least 4 quarts in size). Combine chili flakes with peanuts, ginger, black pepper, star anise, cardamom, cumin, Sichuan peppercorn, mushroom powder, salt, MSG (if using), and sugar. Set aside.

    Set a fine-mesh strainer over a 2-quart heatproof bowl. In a 4-quart saucepan, combine oil and shallots. Cook over high heat while constantly stirring. Once shallots become light golden brown, strain. Pour oil back into pot and add garlic. Cook over medium-low heat, constantly stirring, until light golden brown, then strain. Return oil to pot once more. Set aside fried shallots and garlic.

    Heat oil to 375°F (190°C). Pour hot oil over chilies, spices, and other seasonings. Stir well to distribute hot oil throughout. Set aside to fully cool, about 30 minutes or until bowl or pot is cool to the touch.

    Once chili-and-oil mixture has fully cooled, remove star anise and cardamom pods. Mix in fried shallots and garlic. Pour finished chili crisp into jars and store in the fridge for about 3 months. It can be served immediately, but for best flavor, eat it the next day. Stir well before serving.